Author: News Integrity Initiative

Engaging for trust: What news organizations can (and should) do right now

By Eric Garcia McKinley. Impact Architects recently wrapped up a five month long research project, supported by the News Integrity Initiative at the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at the City University of New York, in which we analyzed engagement practices at four organizations — Outlier Media, a small non-profit; ProPublica, a large non-profit with a national presence; Free Press: News Voices, an information advocacy organization; and McClatchy, a national for-profit publisher. We asked about the relationship of engaged journalism with trust, revenue, and civic engagement. It was illuminating to see how very different organizations approached engaged journalism, and the full research report details the ways in which the organizations converge and diverge, along with recommendations for news organizations and media funders. But without diving into the (thorough!) report, it’s useful to ask what newsrooms can do to apply the research — right now. Here are some actions organizations can take based on our findings. And while you can start to take action as soon as you’re done reading this blog, don’t expect the payoff to come as instant gratification. The …

Connecting the dots: Engaged journalism, trust, revenue, and civic engagement

by Lindsay Green-Barber. Across the news industry, organizations large and small, commercial and nonprofit, single issue and daily news are experimenting with “engagement.” Audience engagement. Engaged journalism. Engagement editors and specialists. Engaging for trust. And the list goes on. But what is engagement? Why are organizations experimenting with it, and to what effect? We set out to answer these questions through a four month research project. First, we surveyed the field to identify the practices organizations consider to be “engaged journalism,” and came to define it as an inclusive practice that prioritizes the information needs and wants of the community members it serves, creates collaborative space for the audience in all aspects of the journalistic process, and is dedicated to building and preserving trusting relationships between journalists and the public. Then, we dove deep into four very different organizations to learn not only what they do, but why they engage with communities and how they know if their strategies are working. Our research builds on that of Lisa Heyamoto and Todd Milbourn’s Agora Journalism Center Report. Through this research, we found evidence to support the …

Creating Contact Zones

By jesikah maria ross. Civic aspiration is a powerful thing — it gives moral imagination someplace to go. — Krista Tippett, Journalist When you begin to imagine and act as if you live in the world you want to live in, you will have company. — Bernice Johnson Regan, Singer/Civil Rights Activist These quotes have been rolling around in my head a lot lately. I’m the Senior Community Engagement Strategist at an National Public Radio affiliate, pioneering new ways to bring together journalists, community members and powerbrokers to explore issues and propose solutions for the places we live. If there is any institution uniquely positioned to activate the public imagination these days, it’s public radio. We’re an independent public service network made up of artful storytellers and huge, devoted audiences. Because our audience represents a narrow demographic, the potential to reflect the distinct and diverse voices within our communities is seismic. Which leads to me the question: How can public radio create a new kind of listening experience where wildly diverse people come together and imagine as communities, examining the world …

Listening Without Prejudice

By John Crowley. At this year’s International Journalism Festival in Perugia, there was a steep incline I would navigate each morning to get to the town centre. The steps of Sant’Ercolano bend around a Baroque church of the same name. It’s all about the ‘journey’ these days and, after I’d dragged my carcass to the top of the hill each morning, I would drink in the view, panting for breath, driven by one journalistic thought: “What in heaven’s name possessed me into having that extra glass of Grappa last night?” From the outside looking in, Perugia might be seen as therapy for jaded journalists. Who fancies sitting atop a medieval Italian town, gazing into the middle distance and momentarily forgetting our industry’s woes? Sure, the spritzers slip down well, but the breadth and quality of IJF is astounding. Hundreds of speakers tackled subjects such as trust in the media, migration, fact-checking, confronting trauma, local journalism, diversity and inclusion, business models, freedom of expression, philanthropy in the media, and much more. Up to 200 volunteers made such a massive …

Listening is a Form of Healing

By Jennifer Brandel. An interview with Margaret Wheatley It’s an absolute thrill to be able to connect the incredible mind and work of Margaret Wheatley with the world of journalism. Before we get to meet and learn from Margaret, there’s some backstory required. In the mid 2000s, as I was learning how to be a journalist, I also became certified as a healer in alternative medicine. I came into that line of work partly out of curiosity, but mostly because I needed to communicate with a family member who was no longer accessible through more common modes of interacting with the world. It was a strange confluence: the reporter brain of questioning and fact-checking everything, with the healer brain of trusting that some knowledge and wisdom cannot be accessed, grasped or verified through the intellect. In holding these two approaches in my daily experience, I began to see both the differences and the overlap. During days practicing journalism, I often felt extractive – that I was interacting with people on my terms, approaching them to …

37 People Struggling to Get by in New Jersey

By Mike Rispoli. When it comes to telling stories of economic hardship, what can journalists learn from social workers? From oral historians? From artists? From community advocates? It turns out, a lot. At a recent workshop at Rutgers University convened by coLAB Arts and Free Press, a dozen people gathered to begin a community collaboration to lift up the stories of New Jersey residents struggling to get by in one of the country’s most expensive states. In New Jersey, 37 percent of residents have trouble affording basic necessities, according to the United Way of Northern New Jersey. Our project, “37 Voices,” will feature interviews with 37 people living in the greater New Brunswick and Newark area who fall into this threshold — working but finding it hard to pay for basic needs. The project’s roots lie in a 2017 collaboration between Rutgers University’s NJ Spark and Free Press. That effort focused on training student journalists in community-engagement techniques and telling the stories of New Brunswick’s working poor. Free Press and the New Brunswick-based group coLAB Arts then decided to take the idea …

Recovery in post-Maria Puerto Rico

By Jesse Hardman. More than a million people access vital information via start-up news site It’s been a harrowing six months since Hurricane Maria hit Freddie Rodriguez’s small town of Juana Díaz near Puerto Rico’s southern coast. An infection from an exposed nail in the storm’s rubble put Rodriguez in the hospital for a stretch. Eventually he returned home to find that a tree had crushed his roof. That’s when community news correspondent Nashaly Alvarado encountered Rodriguez. For the past few months she’s been collecting hurricane recovery news stories and sharing them through “Information as Aid,” a social media-based recovery-focused news feed. Alvarado’s story about Rodriguez ended with a quote: “Lo unico que pido es ayuda para remover el arbol.” (“The only thing I ask is help removing the tree.”) This hyperlocal story got more than a million views, and put a spotlight on the ongoing issues facing many Puerto Ricans as they fight their way back towards normalcy. Rafael Torres read the story and, like many, responded with a comment on Facebook. Unlike all the other …

How to launch Voting Block for your next local election

By Reveal staff. Last year, 25 newsrooms that cover New Jersey joined the collaborative reporting initiative Voting Block. Together, we pioneered a new way to cover elections that brought together newsrooms to use the same engagement framework to inform their reporting. The goal: to spark political dialogue in New Jersey, amplify local priorities from the public for the next governor’s agenda and deepen engagement between communities and newsrooms. To do this, each Voting Block newsroom chose a neighborhood, convened neighbors for a meal, facilitated a discussion using our “Political Potluck” guide and reported on the gubernatorial election through the lens of these neighborhood conversations. Coordinated by The Center for Cooperative Media, The Center for Investigative Reporting and New America Media, Voting Block brought together a diverse cohort of media organizations, including WNYC, WHYY, NJ Spotlight, The Record, Route 40, Zaman Amerika and Reporte Hispano, to collectively pilot this reporting method. The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation provided critical funding to support the project. In the end, Voting Block newsrooms talked with more than 100 neighbors about their political priorities, produced over 70 …

How the Public Fueled Our Investigations in 2017

by Terry Parris Jr. A year ago, we said we would focus more on how the public can participate in our investigative reporting. We wanted to work more collaboratively and openly, and create more opportunities for participation. So, our engagement team focused on finding the right audience — not just the biggest — to not only share our reporting but to help us do reporting. As we wrote last year, that meant hiring journalists who specialize in building and cultivating communities. We decided to call them engagement reporters, and we hired three great ones: Adriana Gallardo, Ariana Tobin and Logan Jaffe. The result? Lots of good journalism that would otherwise not have existed. Here are a few things the public helped us report. You helped us tell the story of why America is the most dangerous place in the developed world in which to give birth. One of ProPublica’s most read stories last year was the tale of a neonatal nurse who died while giving birth at her own hospital. It was the first story in our series examining maternal care in …